Our clinic will remain open during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn More or Call us: 603-893-1646. Get Directions. After Hour Emergencies: 603-870-9770

We provide many surgical services at our clinic including routine spay and neuters, soft-tissue surgeries and orthopedic surgeries. Occasionally, we refer our patients to specialists (board-certified veterinary surgeons) to perform complex operations.


Anesthesia and Patient Monitoring

The types of anesthesia used and patient monitoring techniques vary greatly among veterinary hospitals. When choosing your pet’s surgical facility, be sure to question the types of anesthetics used and the protocols in which they monitor anesthesia. More often than not, the more expensive anesthetics are safest to use, but anesthetics are also chosen for other reasons such as their ability to control pain. Different types of anesthetics are:

1. Tranquilization/Sedation

Tranquilization or sedation is used to calm an animal under various conditions. The animal usually becomes sleepy but is easily aroused when stimulated. Pet owners frequently request sedation for their animals during travel, thunderstorms, or fireworks. Sedation and tranquilization are not without risk and each individual patient needs to be assessed prior to dispensing these medications.

2. General Anesthesia

General anesthetic results in a loss of consciousness in the animal and a loss of sensation throughout the entire body. Most general anesthetic procedures involve several steps beginning with the administration of a sedative. An intravenous injection of an anesthetic renders the animal unconscious while a breathing tube is placed into the animal’s trachea. A gas anesthetic is delivered in combination with oxygen to the animal via the breathing tube to maintain the state of unconsciousness. Although general anesthetics are significantly safer than they have been in the past, there is still the remote chance of an anesthetic accident. There are many ways to reduce the risk associated with anesthesia, including a thorough physical examination and pre-surgical blood work. Anesthetic monitoring equipment and protocol can also contribute to a safer anesthesia.

Patient Monitoring

During anesthesia, our patient’s vital signs are monitored closely by a veterinary nurse. Your pet’s heart rate, respiratory rate, capillary refill time, blood pressure, EKG, and temperature are charted and recorded every five minutes. A change in blood pressure is an early indication of a likely problem. Monitoring our patient’s vital signs so closely during anesthesia allows early intervention on our part and prevents anesthetic risks to your pet.


Spaying

Spaying refers to the surgical procedure performed on female dogs and cats to render them infertile. There are many benefits to spaying your female companion. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, spaying will eliminate the sometimes ‘messy’ heat cycles that attract male dogs or cats to your house from miles away. Third, you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as pyometra (infection in the uterus) and mammary cancer. Spaying involves surgical removal of both ovaries and the uterus. It can be performed under a number of anesthetics and monitoring procedures. If you are shopping around for a competitive price on this procedure, be sure to question the type of anesthetic used and the monitoring equipment and procedures followed. 


Neutering

Neutering refers to the surgical procedure performed on male dogs and cats to render them infertile. There are many benefits to neutering your male companion. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, neutering will eliminate undesirable and at times, embarrassing behavior in your male companion. Third, you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as prostate disease and testicular cancer. Neutering involves surgical removal of both testicles. It can be performed under a number of different anesthetics and monitoring procedures. If you are shopping around for a competitive price on this procedure, be sure to question the type of anesthetic used and the monitoring equipment and procedures followed. 


Soft Tissue Surgery

Soft tissue surgery includes any surgeries not associated with bone. Probably the most common soft tissue surgery performed at our clinic is the removal of masses or ‘lumps’ on animals. Most of these masses or ‘lumps’, once removed and tested, are benign (non-harmful); however, occasionally they are more serious. Early removal and accurate diagnosis of a ‘lump’ is necessary to improve the outcome in your pet if the mass is cancerous. Lacerations are also common in pets and suturing will reduce the chance of infection, improve healing time, and reduce scarring.

Many breeds of dogs are susceptible to ear infections. Surgical treatment on ears improves airflow into the ear canal and can reduce the occurrence of ear infections. Tearing in your pet’s eyes can mean an infection is present or it may be a sign the cornea (outer layer of the eye itself) has been damaged. A damaged cornea may require soft tissue surgery to allow the cornea to heal faster with less scarring. Less scarring will improve the ability of your pet to see. In some animals, the cornea (outer layer of the eye) may be damaged by the eyelid hairs surrounding the eye. Surgical intervention involving the eyelid improves the comfort in these animals. It also reduces the chances of corneal scarring and enhances the animal’s vision in the long term. We would refer your pet to a specialty doctor for these types of procedures that require additional specialist services.


Orthopedic Surgery

Orthopedic surgery refers to bone surgery. There are many different situations where bone surgery may be necessary including leg fractures, hip dysplasia, cruciate ligament repairs, disc disease, etc. Most orthopedic surgeries can be performed at our clinic. Occasionally we refer our patients to a Board Certified surgeon to perform back surgery and other very complex surgeries. Leg fractures are the most common orthopedic problem presented at our clinic and usually result from a mishap with an automobile. They can be treated in a variety of ways depending on the location and type of fracture.

A cast can be applied to the leg to treat certain fractures; however, many fractures will require surgical intervention.

 In the unfortunate event that your pet requires orthopedic surgery, you do, you can be assured that we are able to proceed with a treatment that will enhance your pet’s healing time and reduce the long term potential problems associated with a fracture or other orthopedic surgery.


Referral Services

The majority of your pet’s health needs will be met at our practice; however, there are circumstances where a veterinary specialist may be required. Under these circumstances, we may direct you and your pet to a specialist who is a veterinary specialist with advanced knowledge in a particular area of veterinary medicine or surgery. In some cases, specialized equipment is required to perform procedures that are not routinely performed by general veterinary practitioners. Examples of veterinary specialists include ophthalmologists, oncologists, surgeons, etc.

Contact Us

Main Street Animal Hospital

Location

159 Main Street Salem, NH 03079

Clinic Hours

Monday - Friday: 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Every Other Saturday: 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Sunday: Closed